Love Story (1970) (mini-review++)

Love-Story-1970

(If you’re curious, my review process. It’s also pasted at the end of this post. I don’t believe in Rotten Tomatoes. I just believe in me.)

(***all-purpose SPOILER ALERT*** there may be some in this review)

The mini-review:

Love Story (1970)

acting 9

directing 8

writing 9

effects 8

editing 8

SW score: 42

4.5 out of 5 octopi

++ You could not choose a less creative story for a movie about a love story. But I think that’s exactly the point. It doesn’t promise anything before the lovers meet or anything after they part. The story joyously begins as a sharp-witted comedy with a female lead that is more badass than almost any other in cinema history. That’s not hyperbole. The dialogue is 1970’s dynamic, full of wit and substance and expectations overturned. It then crashes into life-destroying choices, struggle, triumph, and then the cruelest final act. It’s a full love story, full of sound, fury, signifying everything. Ali MacGraw, who plays Jenny, and Ryan O’Neal, who plays Oliver, leave nothing in their arsenals. They exhibit every emotion and resonate with authentic feelings and honesty. But John Marley, who plays Jenny’s father Phil, may have the most devastating line in a script full of earth-shakers. it’s a line you only get once in a career. Arthur Hiller guides this epic to its heart-wrenching finale. The only thing generic about this love story is the title.

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(1) Shark Wrighter (SW) Score: Based on a sum of 5 sub-scores (acting, directing, writing/story, effects: cinematography &/or animation &/or effects, editing) with 1 being terrible and 10 being terrific.

(2) Octopuses (0-5 🐙, with 5 being fantastic and 0 being feces)

(3) Octopuses are my unquantifiable feeling…not that SW score is scientific…but this one is even less so

(4) ++ This optional section includes any incredibly *brilliant observations that don’t fit into simple quantitative slices like the scores and octopuses *(they are likely NOT brilliant)

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